Posts Tagged ‘Branding’

Creating a Logo that Prints

December 15, 2008

by joseph.young.2009

I haven’t come across this material in any of my courses (I haven’t taken Marketing Communication with Professor Gneezy yet), but I have run into it recently when the company I work for decided it was time to rebrand. We were coming up with a new logo because the old brand looked old, too nerdy, and printed poorly. It didn’t work in a 1″ x 1″ space (which it needs to do for a lot of collateral). The intricacy of the log was lost and muddled when reduced to such a small footprint, and the coloring didn’t translate well to B&W.

While thinking about this problem, I had a tasty treat to stimulate my mind. In doing so, I came across a logo that was very well thought out. Let’s see why.

I Love Honey

I Love Honey

Pardon the quality of the photo. The macro capabilities of the iPhone suck. Regardless, beyond the Haagen-Dazs logo, there’s the new “Haagen-Dazs Loves Honey Bees” or “HD <3 HB” for short (‘<3’ is a sideways heart for those who don’t know) in the top left. As a logo on the cover of cap of the sorbet, the logo doesn’t stand out as something that is that special. But look at these two additional photos.

HD <3 HB Bottom

HD <3 HB Bottom

HD <3 HB Side

HD <3 HB Side

Now that you’ve seen the cap from all three sides, something should stand out. The logo prints great in color, B&W gradient, and in B&W solid; all on a small surface. When we picked out our new logo, I tried my best to make sure that the logo would satisfy all of these conditions.

When looking to create a logo for you company, you have to always remember that it’s not just something that you enjoy looking at, but also something that can be easily placed on all the collateral your company will be handing out. Can it be printed in letterhead? On a keychain? On a t-shirt? On a 20 foot banner? If so, then you have a good logo. If not, it’s not the end of the world; it just restricts the versatility of your logo.

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Creating a Brand Ecosystem

November 9, 2008

by joseph.young.2009

A brand (or business) ecosystem allows customers to live in your brand constantly transitioning from product to product or service to service, or a hybrid of the two. Here are some examples.

Microsoft Windows and Office keep your productivity in the Microsoft brand. Moving between the different applications, Word, Outlook, Excel allow you to do what you need to do everyday under the Microsoft umbrella. You’re become engrained in your workflow that requires Microsoft products indefinitely.

Google does the same thing, wrapping the majority of what you do on the internet in the Google brand. Searching is now “googling,” news is google news or google reader, workflow is moving online in google docs. You spend enough time there, and you’re living in the Google ecosystem.

Game have tried this in the past, but now they’re a larger push. I believe this is a result of general content improving on all levels, requiring people to work harder to keep their audience’s attention. One case of this is between Fable II and Fable II Pub Games. The player could play the Xbox Live Arcade game (secondary interface) before the game came out and allow them to build up a gold balance to spend in the main game (primary interface), Fable II. Another recent attempt is in Tiger Woods 09. They’re tying a cellphone game and console game to keep you thinking about golf all day long. The result of these campaigns should see increased sales over other titles. Fable II is off to a great start selling 1.32M units in just a few weeks. The affect of the new cellphone title on Tiger Woods 09 should be iteresting to watch. Last year they sold under 1M units on a single SKU with Tiger Woods 08. Let’s see if the ecosystem can get the title back over the 1M unit mark on a signle SKU like they did back in 04 and 05.

The Smear Campaign… Between Apple and Microsoft

October 20, 2008

by joecool79

If you haven’t seen the newest Apple commercials, you should take a look. The tired method of comparing a Mac to a PC is getting a bit dirty. Apple’s recent campaigns have been a direct attack on Microsoft. In response, Microsoft created a campaign to illustrate that PC users are not just old, stoggie ment in tan coats. And I think they did a good job of it. They such a good job, that Steve had to come back and swing low.

I’m not siding with either camp, mind you. But the fact that Apple’s taking a direct jab at Microsoft for spending money on advertising is a bit hypocritical. Apple has been using TV commercials to promote their products and services for years, and spending tons of money doing so. Watching game 7 of the ALCS, I was bombarded with commercials for the MLB app for the iPhone/iPod touch. I doubt that ad time is cheap, and with all the problems with MobileMe, maybe the company that should be spending less money on advertising and more money on bug fixing is Apple. I only say this because recent reports of Windows Vista indicate that it’s closer to what Microsoft original promised, rather than the half-baked OS that came out initially.

TechCrunch50 – Differentiation in the DemoPit

September 13, 2008
Natalie Terashima o.b.o. FiveSprockets)

TC50 DemoPit (photo credit: Natalie Terashima o.b.o. FiveSprockets)

They billed it as the Sundance of tech conferences and they didn’t disappoint.  At least twice during TechCrunch50, I thought to myself, “Wow.  I just witnessed history being made.” (That distinction goes toSwype and tonchidot which, I swear, was straight out of Minority Report.)

But for those tech companies that weren’t showcased on stage like the chosen 50 and instead had to pay to exhibit, it was a much bigger challenge getting their voices heard.  Read the rest of this entry »

Microsoft’s new brand character is…a middle-aged guy from the 90’s?

August 22, 2008

Yesterday, Microsoft announced a $300 million dollar Windows advertising campaign intended to boost the brand perception of its beleaguered Vista operating system.  This is surely counterprogramming to Apple’s highly successful Mac vs. PC ads which feature John Hodgman as the frumpy, stuffy, middle-aged personification of PC (i.e. Microsoft and Windows).

Their new brand ambassador in this campaign?  Jerry Seinfeld.  Read the rest of this entry »