Posts Tagged ‘Marketing Communication’

Extending the h-index to Twitter

May 28, 2009

by startupmarketingdiva

Recently, I became a Tweeter.   Cool stuff.  And being the quintessential scientist that I am – a practitioner of the scientific method and strong inference, I like to collect and analyze data.  So, I began thinking about Twitter metrics and analytics.

Here are the basic key Twitter metrics to consider:  Number of followers, number following, number of updates, number of @replies, and number of @RT (i.e. “ReTweets”).  I found this last one to be the most intriguing especially after reading The Genius Index: One Scientist’s Crusade to Rewrite Reputation Rules in this month’s issue of Wired Magazine.  In a nutshell, this article is about Jorge Hirsch, a physicist who lives in a world defined by the “publish or perish” mantra, who decides to re-write the algorithm that defines a scientist’s reputation.  It’s not just about the journal impact factor (i.e. the caliber of journal that a scientist’s research is published in), but rather how many times a scientist’s work is cited by other researchers.  This is referred to the h-index (aka “the hirsch index” of course).

Similarly, it’s almost meaningless to note how many followers you have on Twitter.  Because, sooner or later, you’re going to get bots and spammers following you as well.  Plus, some Tweeters follow simply so that you can turn around and follow them – a kind of a diplomatic gesture, I suppose, in the Twitter world.  But, when a Tweet is ReTweeted, that’s when the signal to noise ratio increases for that particular Tweet and Tweeter.

There are groups working on a number of other metrics for Twitter – check out TwInfluence, which is a site where you can measure your influence as a Twitterer.  I don’t know the actual algorithm, but it calculates your degree of influence based on the velocity at which you acquire followers, taking into account their degree of influence, and the number of followers you accumulate over time, among many other metrics.  And, just today, I came across a search engine built especially for the social web called TOPSY (in the interest of full disclosure, one of the founders is my cousin).  It seems that TOPSY’s value is that it returns information in real time and more importantly, it filters the signal from the noise by using  reputation as a key metric.  So, for example, on Twitter, it filters the Tweets (and the links in the Tweets) that are most valuable based on the reputation of the author.  So your search returns information in the context of what people are actually talking about.

There’s a lot going on.  The dust storm is just starting and it’ll be a while before it settles.  But, like the early days of the internet, when the ‘hit counter’ ruled, similarly, in these early days of Twitter, ReTweets are a key metric to consider, or so it seems.

I’d like to hear your comments.  Yours truly – startupmarketingdiva.  Follow me on Twitter @startupmktgdiva.

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Brands Through Time

January 5, 2009

by joseph.young.2009

In the process of my recent move, I came across some products that have survived several decades on the market. It was interesting to see these products still in the market and the changes that have occured.

The first product is Windex, a liquid based glass cleaner.

I assure you that the fluid in the right and left bottles are both Windex. Though the older formula doesn’t have the bright blue color of the new bottle, they both clean glass surfaces well. Some interesting things I noticed: The old Windex was owned by Drackett. The product was targeted at businesses, with its positioning statement reading through in the three bullet points at the bottom of the bottle. Also, the bottle lists the businesses that could benefit from the product: food service, hotels, motels, hospitals, office buildings, nursing homes, schools.

The bottle on the left shows a recent branding of the product. It’s definitely targeted at the consumer these days, and no longer a B2B product. The owner of the Windex brand is now SC Johnson, another chemical company. It’s interesting that both bottles use the word, “institutional” as a descriptor for the product. The value proposition has definitely changed, with the focus being on “streak-free” these days. Another thing to notice is how the new bottle and nozzle are better designed for ergonomics. A small change but important.

Next up, we have Cut-Rite, a wax paper product.

Cut-Rite

Cut-Rite

The older Cut-Rite box was owned by Scott, a paper company (best guess). It’s interesting to see that the price was so prominently labed on the old packaging and is non-exhistant in the current packaging. With promotions and coupon constanting change the prices of goods today, it would be hard to put a price permenantly on a product these days. Looking at the old box, you see a lot of advertisements for complementary products. A wall dispenser for your wax paper. A mug set for “soup ‘n’ beverage.” My best guess is that these were products that Scott had a partership with to collect royalties off sales. They would advertise the products, have them sold by another manufacturer, and then collect royalties off sales. I doubt they were selling the space on their box as pure advertising space.

The recent packaging for Cut-Rite shows that it is now owned by Reynolds. Instead of an easy to read price, you have an easy to scan barcode. In lieu of partner products, the box is covered with informational material on other applications for wax paper. Everyone knows that you can use wax paper to bake with, but did you know that it’s also great for reheating products and protecting kitchen services. If selling the consumer complementary products didn’t work, just get them to use up this product sooner so they have to buy more!

The biggest takeaway from these products is the idea of constantly improving, even when you’re the market leader. These objects are tools. Tools to help you clean, cook, or even protect your kitchen service. A close friend told me the other day in a conversation, “a tool can always be replaced.” And it’s true. If you don’t find ways to make yourselfe valuable, someone else will come out with something better and replace you. Never rest on your laurels.

Creating a Logo that Prints

December 15, 2008

by joseph.young.2009

I haven’t come across this material in any of my courses (I haven’t taken Marketing Communication with Professor Gneezy yet), but I have run into it recently when the company I work for decided it was time to rebrand. We were coming up with a new logo because the old brand looked old, too nerdy, and printed poorly. It didn’t work in a 1″ x 1″ space (which it needs to do for a lot of collateral). The intricacy of the log was lost and muddled when reduced to such a small footprint, and the coloring didn’t translate well to B&W.

While thinking about this problem, I had a tasty treat to stimulate my mind. In doing so, I came across a logo that was very well thought out. Let’s see why.

I Love Honey

I Love Honey

Pardon the quality of the photo. The macro capabilities of the iPhone suck. Regardless, beyond the Haagen-Dazs logo, there’s the new “Haagen-Dazs Loves Honey Bees” or “HD <3 HB” for short (‘<3’ is a sideways heart for those who don’t know) in the top left. As a logo on the cover of cap of the sorbet, the logo doesn’t stand out as something that is that special. But look at these two additional photos.

HD <3 HB Bottom

HD <3 HB Bottom

HD <3 HB Side

HD <3 HB Side

Now that you’ve seen the cap from all three sides, something should stand out. The logo prints great in color, B&W gradient, and in B&W solid; all on a small surface. When we picked out our new logo, I tried my best to make sure that the logo would satisfy all of these conditions.

When looking to create a logo for you company, you have to always remember that it’s not just something that you enjoy looking at, but also something that can be easily placed on all the collateral your company will be handing out. Can it be printed in letterhead? On a keychain? On a t-shirt? On a 20 foot banner? If so, then you have a good logo. If not, it’s not the end of the world; it just restricts the versatility of your logo.

Did you Hulu it?

November 17, 2008

by joseph.young.2009

wikipedia.org

Source: wikipedia.org

Two things recently happened to me relating to Hulu. The first happened last night when I was talking to a classmate at Rady about the most recent episode of The Office, and a funny bit about “microgement.” The gist of the conversation went as follows:

Joseph, it sounded like Jim just messed up the line in the show.


Did you Hulu it? I think he intentionally made up the word.


Did you just call me a name?

My classmate had not heard of Hulu yet. But shortly afterwards, we were able to confirm that it was “microgement” and not “micromanagement.” But how is this different than trying to look it up you YouTube? 1. It’s legal, the show is posted by NBC, and Hulu created tools to allow sharing clips via e-mail and social networks easy. Very easy. 2. The video quality is great. I can’t emphasize this enough. What makes Hulu stand out from YouTube is that the production and video quality is high. Some people thought that YouTube meant the end of television. Partially because you could watch illegally uploaded television there, but partially because people thought that there was enough good user generate content to overwhelm network television. They were wrong. As I’ve emphasized before, it just means that crappy content goes to the wayside, and great content rises to the top. Whether it’s in games, movies, television or any other form of entertainment.

The second interesting tidbit about Hulu is that it’s on the tipping point of going huge. Becoming genericized. I’m definitely not the first person to say this. But within the span of 12 months, Hulu has gone from the top 100,000 websites in the world, to the top 400. There’s a shift in the consumer’s mindset who now considers Hulu as a network rather than a portal. You can watch what you want, when you want (some limitations), and in great quality. And all you have to do is sit through a couple of 30 second commercials.

While I’m on this topic, there are some people that are understanding how to advertise on Hulu, and other who do not quite get it yet. The one who gets it is the team running Christina Aguilera‘s advertising campaign. Tradition television take a commercial and blasts it at the consumer over and over again. We’re smarter than that (at least we think). So if you play the same commercial over and over again, I’m going to take a 30 second break between segments rather than a 2 minute break, or fastforward. Christina’s crew created 4 separate 30 second commercials that formed a single 2 minute commercial that was unique and kept me interested. I’m much less likely to go on a bio break if I know the commercial is a continuation of a whole mini-show that happens to be a commercial.

Hulu did television on the internet right. Other’s are sure to follow with competitors, or if they’re smart, partnerships with Hulu. There’s already great technology and leadership behind them. It’d only be smart to build your own site if you have deep pockets.

The Smear Campaign… Between Apple and Microsoft

October 20, 2008

by joecool79

If you haven’t seen the newest Apple commercials, you should take a look. The tired method of comparing a Mac to a PC is getting a bit dirty. Apple’s recent campaigns have been a direct attack on Microsoft. In response, Microsoft created a campaign to illustrate that PC users are not just old, stoggie ment in tan coats. And I think they did a good job of it. They such a good job, that Steve had to come back and swing low.

I’m not siding with either camp, mind you. But the fact that Apple’s taking a direct jab at Microsoft for spending money on advertising is a bit hypocritical. Apple has been using TV commercials to promote their products and services for years, and spending tons of money doing so. Watching game 7 of the ALCS, I was bombarded with commercials for the MLB app for the iPhone/iPod touch. I doubt that ad time is cheap, and with all the problems with MobileMe, maybe the company that should be spending less money on advertising and more money on bug fixing is Apple. I only say this because recent reports of Windows Vista indicate that it’s closer to what Microsoft original promised, rather than the half-baked OS that came out initially.